Tag Archive | Dr Neil MacFarlane

Back to School

 

I went back to school myself yesterday, starting an MA in Victorian Studies at Birkbeck College, part of the University of London. This follows on from my last blog piece, because quite a few other “Dickens obsessives” have done this course, and some of those teaching on it seem to acknowledge similar afflictions…

Many of my patients, especially those with ADD / ADHD, have thought about picking up where things went wrong in their own education. This may mean going back to do a similar course to the one which they dropped out of; or deciding that was the wrong choice anyway, and studying something quite different.

Although I have dropped out of a couple of courses myself in the past, I’m pretty sure it won’t happen this time. To some extent this is because I believe that I understand my own mild ADD tendencies better (1): my nineteenth-century interest is not an “obsession” in the clinical sense of being related to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but more of a recurrent ADD / ADHD “hyperfocus”.

 

 

(1) See https://drnmblog.wordpress.com/2010/04/16/how-mentally-healthy-should-mental-health-professionals-be/

Another Nobel for Cambridge University

 

One of my past teachers is to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine today.

Professor Robert Edwards, who developed In-Vitro Fertilization, gave an annual series of seminars on embryology to about a dozen Cambridge students specialising in physiology. I was a member of the 1982-3 class, when Edwards was a prominent public figure; not only as a scientist, but also because of his decision to publicly discuss the ethical aspects of IVF in a very proactive way.

Unlike other aspects of the course, where we did experiments on rats, pigs, cats, and ourselves, there were no “practicals” in embryology. So the seminars were, to be honest, a bit dry and theoretical. The realities of fertility only became apparent when I was a clinical student in obstetrics and gynaecology, a couple of years later.

But on one occasion, Professor Edwards’ partner, the pioneering obstetrician Patrick Steptoe, came to tell us about the early days of IVF in Oldham, and we heard also about how they overcame opposition from the various establishment bodies of the day. The scientist and the clinician both loosened up and brought the subject, appropriately enough, to life.

 

 

Published at www.DrNM.org.uk on 10th December 2010; transferred to DrNMblog.wordpress.com on 9th October 2011

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